How Can I Beat This "Super Bug" MRSA Infection?

How Can I Beat This "Super Bug" MRSA Infection?

[ad_1]

Question:

I had surgery recently and a month later I was diagnosed as having the ‘superbug’ MRSA in the wound. I also have a urinary tract infection and am now on my second not of antibiotics. My wound is being dressed every day using an antibiotic cream. Is there anything I can do to encourage this bug to go?I had surgery recently and a month later I was diagnosed as having the ‘super bug’ MRSA in the wound. I also have a urinary tract infection and am now on my second not of antibiotics. My wound is being dressed every day using an antibiotic cream. Is there anything I can do to encourage this bug to go?

Answer:

MRSA, which stands for methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus, was created primarily by over-use of antibiotics. Methicillin was an antibiotic used many years ago to treat patients with staphylococcus aureus infections. The name is used now as an umbrella term to describe this type of antibiotic resistance.

Bacteria are single-cell organisms which, in their fight for survival, mutate and change their constituent protein so as to become resistant to antibiotics. To keep bacteria under control and fight infection, antibiotics are designed to attach to certain proteins in the cell membranes so that cells cannot divide and the infection doesn’t spread. Doctors bombarded the staphylococcal bacteria with antibiotics in an attempt to wipe them out But the bacteria fought back. They changed their cell structure so that the most-used antibiotics had no effect. The bacteria were christened ‘super bugs’ because they became unconquerable. Many medical personnel as well as patients contracted MRSA.

In healthy people, MRSA poses little or no threat. But if you are ill already, it may cause a more serious infection. MRSA usually- but not always- occurs in hospitals. If it is on the skin, it is spread by physical contact. If the bacteria are in the nose or lungs, they are passed by droplets from the mouth or nose. To limit the spread of MRSA in hospitals, patients are isolated and medical staff and visitors wear protective clothing and use strong antibacterial hand wash.

New antibiotics are being developed to control MRSA but in a few years the clever bugs will change again to become resistant to these as well. Instead of mounting a drug assault on bacteria, we need to harness the body’s innate healing power and ability to fight germs then, if necessary use antibiotics sparingly.

In your case, I advise taking special measures to support your immune system. To help fight both your urinary tract infection and the MRSA,

I suggest the following:

* Avoid alcohol, coffee, yeast-containing foods (bread, pasta, beer, etc), sugar and sugar), foods, citrus fruits and very spicy foods.

* To help clear the bladder infection, take the herbal remedy Bangshil: one twice daily for a month.

* Make fresh organic carrot and ginger juice and fresh mint juice, and drink daily for two weeks.

* Get plenty of sleep and take regular exercise.

* Take a good multivitamin and mineral supplement.

* Take the Ayurvedic herbal supplement Bioprash: one tablespoonful with a little honey (manuka, if possible) and water daily for two months.

* Massage your neck and shoulders with Lifestyle Oil. This improves the blood flow to the brain, including the pituitary gland, which is in overall control of the immune system.

* Apply pure neem oil or tea tree oil all over your skin. These are both natural disinfectants and suppress the growth of harmful bacteria. Tea tree oil has been successfully used in trials with MRSA in Australian hospitals. A friend of mine’s mother was hospitalised with a chronic infection and contracted MRSA. Luckily she was then shifted to a nursing home, given infusions of vitamins and minerals and a daily rub with tea tree oil. Within two weeks, the swab test for bacterial growth on her skin was negative. The combination of boosting her immune system and combating the infection topically with a natural medicine had beaten the bug.

Neem oil, is being studied for its antibacterial, insecticidal and antifungal properties. The results are good so far. Neem trees, which are native to India, repel mosquitoes and the extract is used to spray crops. In the old days, cuts and wounds were treated with brushed neem leaves.

[ad_2]

Source by Dr Mosaraf Ali

How Can I Beat This "Super Bug" MRSA Infection?
How Can I Beat This "Super Bug" MRSA Infection?
How Can I Beat This "Super Bug" MRSA Infection?
How Can I Beat This "Super Bug" MRSA Infection?
How Can I Beat This "Super Bug" MRSA Infection?

How Can I Beat This "Super Bug" MRSA Infection?

How Can I Beat This "Super Bug" MRSA Infection?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.